The memes of avalon

Stolen verbatim from Jenna.

This is a list of the 50 most significant science fiction/fantasy novels, 1953-2002, according to the Science Fiction Book Club.

Bold the ones you’ve read, strike-out the ones you hated, italicize those you started but never finished and put an asterisk beside the ones you loved.

The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien
The Foundation Trilogy, Isaac Asimov*
Dune, Frank Herbert
Stranger in a Strange Land, Robert A. Heinlein*
A Wizard of Earthsea, Ursula K. Le Guin
Neuromancer, William Gibson
Childhood’s End, Arthur C. Clarke
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, Philip K. Dick
The Mists of Avalon, Marion Zimmer Bradley
Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury
The Book of the New Sun, Gene Wolfe
A Canticle for Leibowitz, Walter M. Miller, Jr.
The Caves of Steel, Isaac Asimov
Children of the Atom, Wilmar Shiras
Cities in Flight, James Blish
The Colour of Magic, Terry Pratchett
Dangerous Visions, edited by Harlan Ellison
Deathbird Stories, Harlan Ellison
The Demolished Man, Alfred Bester
Dhalgren, Samuel R. Delany
Dragonflight, Anne McCaffrey
Ender’s Game, Orson Scott Card
The First Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever, Stephen R. Donaldson
The Forever War, Joe Haldeman
Gateway, Frederik Pohl
Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, J.K. Rowling
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams*
I Am Legend, Richard Matheson
Interview with the Vampire, Anne Rice
The Left Hand of Darkness, Ursula K. Le Guin
Little, Big, John Crowley
Lord of Light, Roger Zelazny
The Man in the High Castle, Philip K. Dick
Mission of Gravity, Hal Clement
More Than Human, Theodore Sturgeon
The Rediscovery of Man, Cordwainer Smith
On the Beach, Nevil Shute
Rendezvous with Rama, Arthur C. Clarke
Ringworld, Larry Niven
Rogue Moon, Algis Budrys
The Silmarillion, J.R.R. Tolkien
Slaughterhouse-5, Kurt Vonnegut
Snow Crash, Neal Stephenson
Stand on Zanzibar, John Brunner
The Stars My Destination, Alfred Bester
Starship Troopers, Robert A. Heinlein
Stormbringer, Michael Moorcock
The Sword of Shannara, Terry Brooks
Timescape, Gregory Benford
To Your Scattered Bodies Go, Philip Jose Farmer

The funny thing is, I have read a lot more science fiction than this…… in fact science fiction (I never, ever say “sci-fi”, and recommend slow torture for those that do) is what I’ve read the most of. Many of my favorite writers are up there, I just didn’t read those particular books. For instance, Roger Zelazny’s Chronicles of Amber is something I would have put up there…… it’s a 5-book series I liked enough to read twice. I have Lord of Light, I just haven’t gotten around to it yet. Asimov- I’ve read almost all of his fiction…… there’s just a few books I’m holding on to for savoring purposes. I’ve read Vonnegut, Blish, Ellison, Clarke, and I’m pretty sure I’ve read some Sturgeon, just not these particular titles. I guess I know what to read during the summer break from school.

In case you’re wondering why none of them are stricken out, it’s because when I get to hating a book, I generally don’t finish it. I move on to something more palatable. The ones I didn’t like, then, are italicized.

Advertisements

13 Comments

  1. Nah-dah. Obviously I’m not a sci-fi fan. *ducking*

  2. You should try “Stranger in a Strange Land”, I think you might like that one. Besides, I’ve seen you use the word “grok”, which comes from that book.

  3. Group I: LOVED:
    The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien
    Dune, Frank Herbert
    Stranger in a Strange Land, Robert A. Heinlein
    Dangerous Visions, edited by Harlan Ellison (also, DV II)
    Children of the Atom, Wilmar Shiras
    The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams*

    Group II: LIKED A LOT:
    Slaughterhouse-5, Kurt Vonnegut
    Childhood’s End, Arthur C. Clarke
    The Mists of Avalon, Marion Zimmer Bradley
    Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury
    A Canticle for Leibowitz, Walter M. Miller, Jr.
    Ender’s Game, Orson Scott Card
    Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, J.K. Rowling
    The Left Hand of Darkness, Ursula K. Le Guin
    On the Beach, Nevil Shute

    Group III: READ LONG AGO, BUT CAN’T REMEMBER THEM
    The Stars My Destination, Alfred Bester
    The Foundation Trilogy, Isaac Asimov*
    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, Philip K. Dick
    Rendezvous with Rama, Arthur C. Clarke

  4. [scampering about with joy] Thenk yew, Mr. Joe! I read Children of the Atom when I was 12 years old, and just loved it. I had to check it out of the library every time I wanted to re-read it, though, ’cause it was out of print. When I was 19, I couldn’t find it in the library, either. They had “retired” it (!!!).

    I looked around for it for years, trolling through libraries (excuse my phraseology). When I saw it on yer list, I searched the ‘net and discovered it was reprinted in 2004!!! [turning handsprings]

    Mr. Joe wrote: “The funny thing is, I have read a lot more science fiction than this…[…] I’ve read Vonnegut, Blish, Ellison, Clarke, and I’m pretty sure I’ve read some Sturgeon, just not these particular titles.”

    There are some authors listed that I recognize, but not their accompanying titles, which puzzled me for a bit. Then I realized that I read their short stories (and a few novellas) in anthologies, likeDangerous Visions, Dangerous Visions II, and Children of the Atom. [considering] Mebbe the library retired their copy of the later ’cause I wore it out…

    [whisper] BTW, I’ll see to it that Miz Paula is assimilated.

  5. I got started on real science fiction in middle school by reading The Martian Chronicles. I liked it barely enough to pick up Golden Apples of the Sun, also by Bradbury, but I only liked one story- The Sound of Thunder (and I don’t want to see the movie BECAUSE I thought the short story was so good. I didn’t read any more science fiction until high school, when I Robot changed my entire outlook on the genre.

    The Foundation Trilogy (which now has 7 books by Asimov, a few more by others) is well worth a re-read, IMO. I might just do that myself soon.

  6. i confess, i loved those dune books- read ’em all, the whole series. i have read many on the list… always the rebel, and i will probably be sent to prison or hell for saying this… i hated the hitchhiker’s guide, (and i thought the movie sucked, too).

  7. I’m with Paula. A proud ZERO.

  8. I’ve read many of the titles on this list and enjoyed the majority of them. My favorite SF story is not on the list. Written in 1934, “A Martian Odyssey” was Stanley Weinbaums’ first publication. Great Story

  9. Ooh, fun. I’ll do this on my blog tomorrow.

  10. I wanna playyyyyyyy 🙂 I will do this one Friday… I am a HUGE sci-fi fan and reader.

    My favs are (In no particular order): Anne McCaffrey, Piers Anthony, Heinlein, Zelazny, Clarke, Rice… OH Shoot… All of them! hehehe Hugsssssss 😉

  11. jk – I can’t pick up “Hitchhiker’s Guide” because if I do I’ll start reading it again. I can’t help it.

    Ruth – Why PROUD? Do you consider these books to be beneath you? It’s not all like Star Wars, you know. In fact, that isn’t even real science fiction. There is some very well written and thoughtful literature in that list, and beyond it. Do you think we’re lesser intellects because we enjoy it? I suspect that you’re simply pre-judging without facts, much like you do with other subjects. You know, the ones where you don’t allow comments so I can’t post something that actually follows logic?

    Hillbilly – I’ll look that one up. What anthology is it in?

    Jeff and Phoenix – I’ll be looking forward to it.

  12. Yanno I am writing my own little fantasy story… have you been by to read it yet? I could use suggestions and or comments. I have sorta lost my muse and a suggestion or two might get her back, if you catch my drift 😉

    http://thecopperdragoness.blogspot.com

  13. Phoenix,

    I had that in my favorites, as yet unread, when my computer died. I’m ass deep in schoolwork this week, but I’ll try to give it a look next week!


Comments RSS TrackBack Identifier URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s